Friday, 20 July 2018

GUEST POST - Senior Wellness and Loss: Coping With the Death of a Spouse


Couples who have been married for a long time find ways to cope with the idea that death will leave one of them bereaved and alone at some point. Some ignore the thought; others keep the grief and pain of such an event at arm’s length, seeing it as something that’s too far off to concern them. It’s a shock no matter when that day comes, regardless of how well prepared you might be. The sense of loss is so large and profound that it can be difficult to comprehend and appreciate. But as the magnitude of what’s happened sets in, the feeling of grief becomes  overwhelming. And it can take a long time before a grieving senior is able to come to grips with his or her loss. Some never quite get there.
Grief exacts an emotional and physical toll heavy enough to undermine a senior’s well-being and frame of mind if left unaddressed. It can produce a state of depression so deep that it affects the ability to carry out the simplest everyday tasks, such as dressing, eating, and bathing. It may feel as though there’s no point in carrying on with a life suddenly bereft of meaning. Once you reach this point, friends and family members play an important role in helping seniors work through their grief and achieve a sense of wellness.
Finding support
Your ability to resume your quality of life depends on how successfully you cope with your loss. If a year has come and gone and grief hasn’t dissipated, it’s time to seek the support of others, perhaps someone close to you or individuals who can relate to what you’re experiencing. Social interaction occupies your mind and prevents your loss from consuming you. There’s a therapeutic quality to sharing thoughts and feelings with other people. Seek out a support group with people who understand how difficult it is to get over the loneliness you’re feeling. Sometimes, just talking things through can help you acquire a new perspective that makes all the difference.

Day to day
Feeling lost and depressed makes it very hard to function from day to day. A bereaved person may neglect their appearance, hygiene, and everyday responsibilities that used to come easy. If you’re struggling, seek out a loved one who can help with paying bills, shopping for groceries, and seeing that your house is cleaned. Or you might want to hire someone who can take care of the essentials for a while. If things continue to worsen, consult your doctor about your grief and the problems it’s creating in your life.
Self-care
Grieving spouses often neglect their own health and well-being. Given the way you’re feeling, it may seem pointless to get enough sleep, eat healthy foods, and get exercise. But self-care is essential if you’re to find the strength to work through your grief and emerge a stronger person. Try to avoid eating alone. It can accentuate your loneliness, so seek out people to eat out with or invite over for a meal that you prepare together. It will give you something to do and someone to socialize with.
Losing a spouse to addiction
Grief can be complicated when you’ve lost a spouse to addiction. Feelings of anger toward your departed partner, guilt for not being able to help, and a deep-seated longing for the life you’ve known may hit all at once. Seek help so that you’re equipped to cope with the doubt that leaves you wondering what more you could have done.
Transition
The loss of a spouse produces a torrent of emotion and conflicting thoughts. How well you deal with the sorrow, anger, depression, guilt, and loneliness that follows has a lot to do with how successfully you make the transition to a new life. Remember that taking care of yourself and seeking help when you need it can give you the strength to carry on.
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Contributed by: Karen Weeks, ElderWellness.net

Karen created ElderWellness.net as a resource for seniors who wish to keep their minds, bodies, and spirits well. 

Tuesday, 3 July 2018

GUEST POST - Tips for Getting Better Sleep as you Age

Sleep is a necessary part of maintaining your health even for seniors, who often sleep only a few hours a night. Experts recommend seven to eight hours of sleep per night for people over the age of 64, according to the National Sleep Foundation.

Senior Care Corner agrees, writing that some of the benefits of getting a full night’s sleep as you age include:

      Possibly lowering risk of mental decline
      Improved cognitive abilities
      Better memory and concentration

Unfortunately, nearly one-third of seniors report sleeping less than seven hours per night. If this is you, what can you do get more sleep?

Finding the Right Mattress

The first step to a good night’s sleep is finding the right mattress for your needs, and that’s why it’s a good idea to try the mattress first. If you are looking to save money by purchasing a mattress online, CNET recommends you find a brand with a long history that comes with a money-back guarantee. Some places will let you try a mattress in your home for 30, 60, or even 120 days.

You should make sure your mattress addresses any problems you have. For example, if you have lower back pain, you may want to read this post from Spine Health. If you get too hot when you sleep, you might want to investigate buying a “cool” mattress, like these options from Sleep Advisor.

Preparing for Sleep

Adults, like kids, should have a nighttime routine that helps them wind down. Reading is one option, but don’t use an electronic device before bed. It emits light that can disturb your sleep patterns unless you use a blue light blocker found on many tablets or phones. Learn more about blue light at The Sleep Doctor.

You should also make sure that your room is set up to promote adequate sleep. Try room-darkening blinds if you have a bright light source outside your bedroom. Make sure your room is the right temperature and get a good pillow that supports your neck. You might also want to try a white noise machine if you wake up frequently.

How Diet and Exercise Impact Sleep

Diet and exercise can improve your sleep habits as well:

      Regular exercise and activity work your body, but it also helps you feel tired at night and allows you to sleep more soundly.
      Caffeine and spicy foods can keep you up, but research suggests that other foods, such as milk products, fish, fruit, and vegetables, may promote sleep. More research needs to be done to confirm this, but you may want to consider these healthy choices for your dinner.
      Halting liquids after 7:00 pm may reduce the problem of frequent nighttime bathroom visits. However, if this is a persistent problem, talk to your doctor to ensure there isn’t a medical issue.

Napping Helps Cognition

Another way to get adequate sleep is napping. Research indicates several benefits of napping, including better focus and improvement in mood and performance. However, naps should not be longer than 30 minutes; the longer the nap, the higher the risk of falling into a deep sleep, making it very hard for you to wake up. On the other hand, naps of at least 10 to 15 minutes have been shown to improve alertness and cognition.

When Sleep Becomes a Struggle

If you’ve been struggling to get or stay asleep for several months, it’s likely time to see your doctor for help. Prolonged reduced sleep can impair your brain functioning as well as your physical health. Learn more about possible sleep disorders from Harvard Medical’s Healthy Sleep website.

If you are having sleep issues, try these recommendations or consult with your physician for more help.

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Contributed by: Karen Weeks, ElderWellness.net


Karen created ElderWellness.net as a resource for seniors who wish to keep their minds, bodies, and spirits well.