Monday, 15 April 2019

Private Solutions in a Public System

How do you feel about reaching out to the private sector for care or services? I think this is a question we are going to be called upon to answer more and more frequently in the coming years as our population demographic changes. It seems as if our healthcare system is already stretched and limited resources means that wait times for care and services will simply increase. For those that need or want services quickly, reaching out to the private system, for those that can afford it, seems like the next likely step.
This of course means that our system will increasingly become two-tiered but I would argue that to a certain degree, it already is. There are private medical clinics. There are private home health care services. There are retirement homes - all private. All of these services are provided for a fee outside of our public health system. They are responsive, provide quick services and resources, meet a need and fill in some significant cracks in our existing system.
Our current public system has some major holes. There are many who simply can't afford private service and must wait for what our government funded system can provide. For some this means living at risk in the community - needing care they simply can't access, until things worsen enough that they end up in hospital or in a nursing home. This is a problem that will only get worse, stretching our system further. For those on basic pension, this is truly an unfortunate scenario that there is no immediate solution to unless our government looks at innovative ways to resolve it.
But what about those who have the means to pay for extra care? There is an expectation of many that we should not have to pay for healthcare which is indeed what universal healthcare is all about. But what happens when what exists can't meet the needs? Is it fair to close the door to the private options, or simply not present them to people we help even if they can afford them? I ask this because I do know of colleagues who stand by the belief that people should not be 'told' or 'asked' to seek private solutions when our healthcare plan is meant to provide for us.
I would argue that you are doing people a disservice when you do not present all available options - public and private - allowing them to decide if they want to purchase care or services to supplement or replace what our government is able to provide. People need to be given the option of choosing for themselves, and if they can afford private care, it may indeed be their preference and a better option than waiting on the limited services our public system can provide.
When I first started visiting retirement homes many years ago, I was amazed at the stories of people who moved in needing assistance but who, over time, with proper care, nutrition, social stimulation, exercise and medication management, improved and became substantially more independent. If many of these people stayed in their homes, they would have eventually ended up in nursing homes. It speaks to the importance of retirement homes in our system on so many levels - of a private solution to a problem in our public system. So, I ask you, if an option exists that can meet a need, isn't it important to explore it, even if it is private pay?

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