Friday, 28 June 2019

GUEST POST - How to Get Your Best Sleep in Your Senior Years


Aging brings with it a whole host of changes to your body and mind. You might even find yourself changing the way you do things in order to compensate for some of these shifts.  What many people don’t realize, however, is that you might need to do the same for your sleep habits. Sleeping can become more difficult as you age, but that doesn’t mean that you can’t get a full night’s rest. There are a few different things you can do to get the best sleep possible in your senior years.

Listen to Your Body

As you age, you might notice that you begin to feel tired earlier in the evenings. Instead of comfortably staying up until 10PM, for example, you could find yourself nodding off around 8PM. Many people will fight these feelings and attempt to power through the evening on their own terms, but why fight your body? It’s telling you it is tired for a reason. Consider listening to it and adjusting your bedtime accordingly rather than attempting to deny the shift in your circadian rhythm.

Get Help for Insomnia

Insomnia is a particularly common issue to face as you age. The problem is that many people attempt to ignore the problem and move on with their lives rather than seek help. Because sleep is so vital to our physical and mental health, this course of action can be quite harmful. Instead of ignoring the issue, consider reaching out to a professional. This isn’t a “small issue” – it’s one that can impact your health significantly. If you find yourself unable to sleep, professional help could be the answer. Your doctor might be able to help you overcome the issue and return to peaceful nights full of rest.

Create an Environment Conducive to Sleep

Aging can be difficult on your body. You likely find that you have more aches and pains in the morning than you did when you were younger, but the pain at night might surprise you. There are many different health issues that can contribute to persistent pain, including things like osteoarthritis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, or simply strain on the important joints in your body. A mattress that is designed to help support you as you sleep could help by reducing stress on your body while you rest. You might also consider creating a quiet, cool bedroom that is dedicated to relaxation. Keep the TV and tablets out of the room and use the space for its intended purpose – sleeping.

Keep Exercising

Staying active might be the last thing you want to do if you’re not sleeping well. It’s important to note, however, that exercise can actually help regulate your sleep patterns and enable you to fall and stay asleep. You don’t have to engage in any particularly in-depth or strenuous workouts, either. Simply taking a walk a few times a week can be enough to help improve your sleep.

Sleeping as you age can be difficult, but it is not impossible.

Keep the information above in mind and work towards your sleep goals one tip at a time.

Contributed by: Lisa Smalls
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Lisa Smalls is a freelance writer for NC that regularly covers sleep health and lifestyle topics. She is always looking for ways to better herself and has a passion for helping others create a balance in their lives.

Friday, 14 June 2019

Elder Abuse Awareness

Elder Abuse, like all kinds of abuse, is often unreported (and under reported), likely because in far too many instances it is perpetrated by someone close to the senior. "North American studies indicate that between 2 and 10 per cent of older adults will experience some type of elder abuse or neglect each year." http://www.elderabuseontario.com/what-is-elder-abuse/). With the number of seniors increasing annually, this figure is truly disheartening and clearly this abuse, like all abuse towards a vulnerable sector in our society, really needs to be publicized; as a society, we need to do everything possible to combat it and assist victims. 
Abuse towards an elder can take many forms and includes not just physical abuse but also, psychological, emotional, verbal, financial, sexual abuse and neglect. Family members and caregivers, closest to a person, are in an ideal position to take advantage of a senior and some, who may be experiencing caregiver burnout, may not even recognize that they are victimizing the person. There are also people external to family, that are in a position of trust, like paid caregivers or neighbours who also are in a position to be an abuser especially if a senior is vulnerable and does not have regular family or friends who visit and know what is going on in their lives on a regular basis. 
If you know someone who is elderly and is exhibiting signs of unexplained injury, fear, anxiety, depression, helplessness, poor hygiene, unexplained weight loss, missing money or missing valuables, it may be time to reach out to them in privacy to let them know your concerns and ascertain if what you are seeing may be a sign of elder abuse. Always investigate properly and refer to professionals before jumping to any unnecessary conclusions. Never assume Elder Abuse is happening without proof, especially if you are not overly familiar with the person and their situation; each situation is unique and cultural differences may explain certain behaviours. Don't jump to conclusions but also, keep an eye out for possible issues. Visit http://www.elderabuseontario.com/ to find out more signs and symptoms or call 416-916-6728. If you are a senior and need assistance, call the Seniors Safety Line at 1-866-299-1011.
Abuse is not acceptable in any form.  June 15 is World Elder Abuse Awareness Day. It's unfortunate that we need to be reminded that we all bear the responsibility of of helping someone who is being abused.